What’s in a Name?

Just a few weeks ago, we had the worst storm of the year in South Florida. It is ironic and I suppose a commentary on human nature that there was no worry, no panic, no mad rush to Home Depot or Publix and no one was calling out sick. No nada nothing (as we say here in Miami). I didn’t even write a blog leading up to it. Why? The only reason I can think of it that we didn’t give it a name. If we had called it Tropical Storm Oprah, there would have been wall to wall news coverage with all of the above.

Just a few weeks ago, we had the worst storm of the year in South Florida.  It is ironic and I suppose a commentary on human nature that there was no worry, no panic, no mad rush to Home Depot or Publix and no one was calling out sick.  No nada nothing (as we say here in Miami).  I didn’t even write a blog leading up to it.  Why?  The only reason I can think of it that we didn’t give it a name.  If we had called it Tropical Storm Oprah, there would have been wall to wall news coverage with all of the above.

A few things did happen that we had to contend with, mostly minor.  It did rain a bunch, 10 inches in 48 hours, 30 mph winds, seven foot waves at the beach, rip tides and flash floods.  We sprang a couple of leaks at Homestead Hospital and West Kendall Baptist Hospital.  There was some concern about flooded streets making it difficult for staff to arrive or depart.  The Transport Center staff starting making arrangements to move people back and forth, just in case, but it wasn’t necessary in the end.

Still, it was pretty much business as usual all over South Florida and the Keys, with all kinds of events going on as scheduled, the Columbus Day Regatta happened, the Miami Broward Carnival went on (just a little wet), and all of the stores and restaurants were open.  The lack of concern was kind of refreshing, and all was dealt with in the normal course of things that go on when you live in the sub-tropics.

What brings this to mind is that far out in the Gulf is something now called Hurricane Rina.  We are looking at it as it is something of an anomaly this late in the season.  Now that it has a name though, it has come to everyone’s attention, and we are already seeing the signs.  A little worry here and there, questions about work and what will we do. The NewsPlex is cranking up with regular reports.  But….this pretty unlikely, probable non-event is still five days away from even being a consideration.

And here I am, just like all the rest, writing about it because it has a ……..!

“Just call my name and I’ll be there in a hurry
On that you can depend and never worry”

Ain’t No Mountain High Enough — Diana Ross

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Hurricane Irene Update 2 Plus

The situation for us here in Miami and the Keys, and all of South Florida, has continued to improve. We now expect Hurricane Irene to brush by us off-shore with the most likely effects being similar to the typical strong thunderstorms we normally experience this time of year.

The situation for us here in Miami and the Keys, and all of South Florida, has continued to improve.  We now expect Hurricane Irene to brush by us off-shore, with the most likely effects being similar to the typical strong thunderstorms we normally experience this time of year. 

Baptist Health will maintain normal operations as we expect no disruption related to Hurricane Irene.  It is likely that we will see some heavy rain from feeder bands on Thursday and Friday, so take that into consideration as you travel to and from work.

We will continue to monitor the situation. Thanks to everyone for their expressions of dedication and availability to care for our patients no matter what the weather.  It is deeply appreciated

In the meantime, we had a Baptist Health team go down to Haiti late last week to perform surgical (58 cases!) and medical work for the many still in dire post earthquake circumstances.  On this trip were Michele Ryder, Tony Gonzalez, Magdalie Gedeon, Aylin Vidal, Lois Wise-Kist Iccledan Acclien, Priscilla Bailey, Michael Canning, Valerie Davis, Antoine Dessources, Roselaure Gousse, Socrates Haydar, Ivannia Hernandez, Bret Kendon, Kris Kist, Pierre Limosin, Tameeka Loussaint, Salvador Marin, Martha Pearson, Francisco Perez, Yeni Rauda, Luc Richards, Mabel Rodriguez, Farah Saint-Louis, Samuel Saturn, Ytimea Sony, Nancy Thelusma, Jorge Valdes, Ken Willis and Calvin Babcock.  As the storm began to approach Haiti we were concerned about them finishing their work in time to get out of there.  Fortunately that worked out.  We did, however, have to evacuate one of our surgeons who fell ill while doing surgery there.  I want to recognize Elmer Loaiza, supervisor of transport for the Baptist Health Transfer Center, for expeditiously getting our sick doc out of there in a hurry (ably assisted by David Aragon)  Your expertise in patient transport logistics is unequaled.  By the way, the hidden jewel TTC moves 2,000 patients a month to make sure that our patients are in the right bed, at the right facility, with the right staff, and the right equipment.

Due to storm, we also had to postpone a trip to The Bahamas that is an annual effort to assist several orphanages there.  Each year the staff of South Miami Hospital donates clothing, school supplies and other needed items.  On this trip are Nancy Pobiones, Rooney Brodie, Christine Stiltner-Angulo, and Karen Vassell from West Kendall Baptist Hospital.  Rest assured, as soon as we get clearance from the Bahamians, they will be there.

One more thing, Baptist Health was named one of the Best Places to Work by Modern Healthcare Magazine(again) this week.  These people named above, and the things they do, are a big part of why we are just that.

Irene goodnight, Irene goodnight
Goodnight Irene, Goodnight Irene
I’ll see you in my dreams

Goodnight Irene — Leadbelly

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